Being Human Series 3 Episode 6 – Daddy Ghoul.

Sundays, BBC 3, 9PM.

Warning: SPOILERS AHEAD.

After last week’s dark and tense episode I wondered what this week would bring. The next time trailer had suggested the episode might be a little lighter, how would the transition work?

The episode starts with a scene between Herrick and Mitchell back in the 1930s. Herrick hints strongly to Mitchell that there is a way that vampires can avoid a final death, and that this secret is passed on to a protege. Moving back to the present comes the discovery that George’s father, George Senior has died. George hasn’t seen his parents since he became a werewolf so decides (after Annie attempts and fails to offer her condolences) to go along to the funeral but keep out of sight. When he gets there he finds his dad also watching the funeral from a distance, clearly he is a ghost with some unfinished business. George tries to help him to work out what it is he needs to do so that his door will appear, even going with Nina and visiting his mom and her new partner. It is when they return from this visit that they discover that George Senior is actually alive, he faked his own death with the thought of making a new start, but George and Nina help him to realise that he and George’s mom do still love each other. After reuniting them George reveals that he and Nina are werewolves, his parents of course don’t believe him and a new status quo is reached.

Mitchell meanwhile is still dealing with Herrick, when he finds the older vampire writhing with pain he tries to feed him blood, knowing it is the solution to his pains and possibly also his amnesia. Herrick resists though, spitting out what little he was forced to accept. DC Nancy Reid from the police investigation into the train massacre arrives, she explains to Mitchell that she’s just there so that she can say that she’s followed the lead up but she doesn’t expect to find anything, all the while dripping blood from a leg wound. Nina fixed up Nancy’s leg and tried to find out more about whether Mitchell was a suspect, Herrick watched this exchange whilst eavesdropping. Mitchell protests his innocence and Nancy suggests the anonymous tip off could have come from someone he’d annoyed. Back at the police station she revealed she is suspicious of him, Annie has followed her – scared for Mitchell – and hears this, Mitchell has fobbed Annie off with the idea that it was Daisy who committed the crime so Annie plants this idea for Nancy. Whilst at the police station Annie spotted Lia’s picture on the crime board, recognising her from purgatory Annie feels the need to help Nancy solve the crime. Nancy returns to the B&B and Mitchell goes along with the idea that Daisy was somehow involved. Whilst Nancy went to use the bathroom Herrick appears, after seeming tempted to feed from her he instead shows her the dossier. Mitchell stopps her from taking it away, claiming it exists purely because he’s interested in the story. Whilst Nancy is sure that this is proof of his guilt, Mitchell burns the dossier.

I loved the contrast between the lighter story between George and his family and the darker, tense story involving Mitchell, Annie, Herrick and Nancy. The two played out well against each other, for me the balance was just right. My favourite things this week were:

  • George and George – The relationship between George and his father was lovely, the humour in their similarities was played to great effect.
  • Nancy – I found myself left with questions about Nancy by the end of the episode, why is it that she cares so much about this case? Is it just the opportunity to prove herself or does she have a more personal reason for being so involved?
  • Annie – yet again Annie got a brilliant moment, this week it came as she mashed W.H. Auden and Cheryl Cole in an attempt to offer her condolences.

With only two episodes left in the series there is still a lot that needs answering. I get the feeling the final two parts of this story are going to pick up the pace and darkness once more.

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